Day Two (Part 1) – Fushimi Inari and Nara

This is a continuation of the Japan Trip Report. You can read more here:
Booking Lufthansa First Class Using United Miles
Lufthansa First Class Denver to Frankfurt
Lufthansa First Class Terminal Frankfurt
Lufthansa First Class Frankfurt to Osaka
Day 1: Nijo Castle and Kinkaku-ji
Westin Osaka Review

As this is a long day I’m going to break the report up into two parts. On day two we checked out of the Westin Osaka and took our luggage with us to Kyoto. We took the train again to Kyoto and found coin lockers in Kyoto Station where we could store our luggage for the day for 600 yen (or ~$6). We then took a different line to get to Fushimi Inari, a shrine that was just a short ride from Kyoto station. When we got off the train in Fushimi, we weren’t quite sure where to go. We stopped to ask a train station attendant where the shrine was. Definitely wasn’t one of our brighter moments as he just pointed to the giant torii gate (which the shrine is famous for) directly across the street. Opps!

Large Torii Gate Outside Fushimi Inari

Large Torii Gate Outside Fushimi Inari

The shrine was neat to check out, with ornate buildings and several fox statues.

Fushimi Inari

Fushimi Inari

Fushimi Inari was incredibly crowded. We wandered through for a little bit. The torii gates up the hill were very neat, and were donated by individuals or companies. The writing on the gates is the donor’s name.

Torii Gates at Fushimi Inari

Torii Gates at Fushimi Inari

We had a lot planned for today (too much, unfortunately), and as we were transferring to Tokyo later in the day we didn’t have a whole lot of time to spend at Fushimi Inari. We walked up a little bit, but there were so many people that we decided to just head to Nara. Definitely worth a visit as the gates were impressive, but probably better to go earlier or later and avoid the crowds.

Nara was a little further from Kyoto, but still an easy trip by train. In Nara, deer are sacred. There are free-roaming deer throughout the town. It was funny watching traffic stop for the deer who had the right of way. We decided to head towards the park, where there was a decent deer population.

Free-roaming Deer in Nara

Free-roaming Deer in Nara

The fall colors around Nara in November were gorgeous!

Fall Colors in Nara

Fall Colors in Nara

There were several stands set up by the park selling rice crackers to feed the deer for 150 yen (~$1.50). The deer were so cute! They were slightly aggressive when you started to feed them. I made my boyfriend go first and he was head butted a couple times by one deer while he was feeding another. One of the deer bit my jacket since I wasn’t handing out the rice crackers quickly enough! I developed an elaborate deer feeding dance. I would throw a cracker to get the aggressive dirty one away, take two steps back and feed the less aggressive ones, then repeat. This one was my favorite:

Cute Sacred Deer in Nara

Cute Sacred Deer in Nara

The entire time we were in Nara it looked like the sky might open up and it would start pouring. We didn’t spend very much time there because of that – but there was definitely enough to do in Nara to fill a long day!/p>

I had read something online about a light show in Nagoya – which turns out to be along the bullet train route from Osaka to Tokyo. Since we had to plan to be there around 5:30pm and have enough time there to catch one of the later buses back to the station and bullet trains into Tokyo we went ahead and headed back to the train. After a quick stop in Kyoto to grab our luggage we caught the bullet train towards Tokyo – with a stop in Nagashima for Nabana no Sato’s light show. Stay tuned for the continuation including the light show!

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About Rebecca

I'm an engineer who is new to the points game. Hoping to share my discoveries as I collect points to travel the world.

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